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No Fail Easy Yorkshire Pudding Recipe (Small Batch)

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This CRAZY easy Yorkshire pudding recipe has served me well for years. Once you know a few simple tricks, I guarantee you will master the Yorkshire pudding too! Read on to learn just how simple it is to make the perfect Yorkshire pudding every single time…

Yorkshire puddings in a Yorkshire pudding pan with a mustard yellow napkin in the background.

The Sunday dinner (or Sunday roast) is a classic British staple. Ever since I was a little girl, the carbs were always my stand out favourite! Skip the meat and veg – just hand me a plate of proper homemade crispy roast potatoes and Yorkshire puddings, smother it in gravy and I’m a happy lady! It could only be improved with my vegetarian mince and onion pie. (Which, let’s be honest, is covered in carbs!)

A Yorkshire pudding with gravy being poured over it in a small white bowl set over a mustard yellow napkin. There's a fork resting on the bowl and more Yorkshire puddings in a Yorkshire pudding tin in the background.

Like many of you, I struggled for years to get these right. For some reason, perfecting Yorkshire puddings always seems an impossible task doesn’t it?!

Yorkshire puddings in a Yorkshire pudding pan with a mustard yellow napkin and 2 forks in the background.

Well not any more! My Yorkshire pudding recipe honestly couldn’t get any easier. And when used alongside my simple but very effective top tips – guarantee great results every time!

Yorkshire puddings in a Yorkshire pudding pan with a mustard yellow napkin in the background.

So make sure to follow the recipe carefully (although, it really is very easy!) and check out the ‘top tips’ section to ensure your Yorkshire pudding success.

Yorkshire puddings in a Yorkshire pudding pan with a mustard yellow napkin and a fork in the background.

How do you make Yorkshire puddings rise?

It’s all in the resting and temperature of your oven/oil. If you allow your batter to rest, covered at room temperature, for at least 1-2 hours before baking, the rise will be a million times better. Equally, team this up with preheating the oil in your tin before adding the batter and having a very hot oven – your Yorkshire puds are going to be seriously bad boy!

A Yorkshire pudding with gravy poured over it in a small white bowl set over a mustard yellow napkin. There's a fork resting on the bowl.
Yorkshire puddings in a Yorkshire pudding pan with a fork in the background.

What’s the best oil to use for Yorkshire Puddings?

In my experience, I’ve had the best results with Rice Bran oil (affiliate link). Why? Because it has a very high smoke point (250ºC). Meaning that you can get this oil really hot before it even starts smoking! Olive oil’s smoke point can be as low as 190ºC, making it a bad choice for cooking Yorkies.

Birds eye view of Yorkshire puddings in a Yorkshire pudding pan with a mustard yellow napkin and 2 forks in the background.

Can you reheat Yorkshire Puddings?

I actually find this to be the most convenient method! You don’t to want to cook the rest of your Sunday roast at 230ºC do you? No, you’ll burn everything to a crisp. Cooking them a little before the rest of your Sunday dinner, then reheating to crisp them up for 4-5 mins before serving, means you get the best Yorkshire puddings without spoiling the rest of your dinner!

Yorkshire puddings in a Yorkshire pudding pan with a mustard yellow napkin and 2 forks in the background.

How do you stop Yorkshire puddings from deflating?

The answer to this is three fold. Firstly, your oven needs to be hot enough and they need to be cooked on the top shelf, as that’s where it’s hottest. Secondly, you need to preheat the oil in the tin until it’s SUPER hot before adding the batter. And thirdly, you need to cook them until they are dark brown. None of this flimsy light golden nonsense – that’s a recipe for deflating Yorkshires. Push the cooking as far as you can before burning. This will make the batter more crisp and sturdy, preventing deflation.

A Yorkshire pudding with gravy being poured over it in a small white bowl set over a mustard yellow napkin with a fork by it's side.

How long should you let Yorkshire pudding batter rest for?

This is a really important part of making Yorkshire puddings as it gives them a much better rise. To show you exactly how much – I did an experiment to test how different resting times would effect the rise. Here are the results…

These Yorkshire puddings were rested for 1 hour before baking…

Baked Yorkshire puddings in a Yorkshire pudding pan (these had been rested for 1 hour)

These Yorkshire puddings were rested for 2 hours…

Baked Yorkshire puddings in a Yorkshire pudding pan (these had been rested for 2 hours)

And these ones were rested for 4 hours before baking…

Baked Yorkshire puddings in a Yorkshire pudding pan (these had been rested for 4 hours)

Let’s take a look at a side by side comparison shall we? From left to right they were rested for 1 hour, 2 hours and 4 hours.

Yorkshire puddings on a wire cooling rack with 3 in front showing the size effect that different resting times have.

That’s a pretty big difference isn’t it?! You see, some things are worth the wait! In my experience (with this particular recipe) I recommend resting for a minimum of 2 hours before baking to get a good rise. If you have 4 hours to spare? As you can see, you’ll get an even better result!

Yorkshire puddings in a Yorkshire pudding pan with a mustard yellow napkin and 3 forks in the background.

Recipe Ingredients

Here’s everything you need to know about the ingredients needed for this recipe:

  • Egg – I prefer free range organic but whatever you have will work fine. Try to use an average sized egg (not too big, not too small).
  • Milk – I find semi skimmed to work best but you can substitute with most milks, including dairy free. Just be aware that it may effect the flavour.
  • Water – Cold tap water is perfect!
  • Flour – Use only plain/all purpose flour for making Yorkshires.
  • Salt – Regular table salt will work fine as we want flavour, not texture (which is where sea salt etc comes in).
Yorkshire puddings in a Yorkshire pudding pan with a mustard yellow napkin and 2 forks in the background.

Easy Yorkshire pudding recipe top tips!

Important, please read! These tips are paramount to making perfect Yorkshire puddings every time.

  • Whisk the batter until smooth, you don’t want any lumps.
  • 100% rest your batter before you bake it. (See the section ‘How long should you let Yorkshire pudding batter rest for?’ above for specifics.)
  • Use Rice Bran oil (affiliate link) as you can get it much hotter than other types.
  • Cook your Yorkshire’s an hour or so before the rest of your Sunday dinner then warm through/crisp up for 4-5 mins before serving.
  • Bake Yorkshire puddings on the top shelf of your oven as this is where it’s hottest.
  • Get the oil as hot as you can! It should sizzle when you add the batter.
  • Don’t open the oven door during cooking or they could deflate. If you absolutely have to – make it QUICK!
  • Don’t be fooled by the colour. Keep baking them until they’re quite a dark brown colour. They’re less likely to deflate this way.
  • Have your Yorkshire puddings deflated? It could be that your oven wasn’t hot enough, the oil wasn’t hot enough when you added the batter (did it sizzle?), or you didn’t cook them for long enough. Don’t aim for pale golden, go darker!
A Yorkshire pudding with gravy being poured over it in a small white bowl set over a mustard yellow napkin. There's a fork resting on the bowl.

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Birds eye view of Yorkshire puddings in a Yorkshire pudding pan with a mustard yellow napkin and 2 forks in the background.

No Fail Easy Yorkshire Pudding Recipe

Here is what you will need to serve 2-3 people. (Makes 5-6 small / 2-3 large)

(For a printer friendly version, see the recipe card at the end of this post)

Please be aware of the resting time required in this recipe before making.

  • 1 Egg, beaten
  • 60ml (4 tbsp) Milk
  • 60ml (4 tbsp) Water
  • 32g (4 tbsp) Plain/All Purpose Flour
  • 1/4 tsp Salt
  • Oil for Cooking

Essential Equipment

  • Jug
  • Fork/Whisk
  • Yorkshire Pudding Tin

To make the batter, beat together the egg (x 1, beaten), milk (60ml| 4 tbsp) and water (60ml| 4 tbsp) in a jug with a fork, until it’s nicely blended together.

Egg, milk and water in a glass jug
Egg, milk and water beaten together with a metal fork in a glass jug

Then add the flour (32g | 4 tbsp) and salt (1/4 tsp) and beat again. You want it to be as smooth as possible. If you can’t achieve this with a fork, grab a whisk and use that instead to beat out any lumps.

Flour and salt being added to a jug filled with beaten egg, milk and water.
Yorkshire pudding batter in a glass jug

Once completely smooth, cover the jug and leave to rest at room temperature for an absolute minimum of 1 hour. Ideally 2 hours but, if you have it, 4 hours! (See the ‘How long should you let Yorkshire pudding batter rest for?’ section earlier in this post for details.)

When there’s about 15/20 mins left on the ‘resting time’ clock, it’s time to prep for cooking.

How to bake Yorkshire Puddings

Pour about 1 tsp of oil into 6 holes of a Yorkshire pudding tin. (See the ‘What’s the best oil to use for Yorkshire Puddings?’ section towards the top of this post for tips.)

A Yorkshire pudding pan where 5 holes are filled with a small amount of oil

Place it onto the top shelf of your oven then preheat to 230ºC/Fan 220ºC/446ºF. You want that oil HOT! Wait for your oven to come up to temperature and the oil to heat up before moving on to the next step.

If your batter has split during resting, give it a stir with a fork to bring it back together again. Then, acting quickly, take the hot tin out of the oven and pour the batter into each hole. The oil should be so hot it sizzles when the batter hits it.

Yorkshire pudding batter being poured into a yorkshire pudding tin filled with hot oil

Carefully but quickly put the tin straight back in the oven and bake for 15-20 minutes until the Yorkshire puddings are a dark brown colour.

Don’t be tempted to open the door constantly. Leave it closed the whole time! If you absolutely need to check, open and close the door quickly.

Baked Yorkshire puddings in a Yorkshire pudding pan (these had been rested for 4 hours)

And there you have it! Some seriously epic homemade Yorkshire puddings! Well done you 🙂

Yorkshire puddings in a Yorkshire pudding pan with a mustard yellow napkin in the background.

Have you made this recipe?

Have you made these epic Yorkshire puddings? I’d love to know if you have! Send me your pics, comments and questions on Facebook, Twitter & Instagram or email me at emma@kitchenmason.com.

A Yorkshire pudding with gravy being poured over it in a small white bowl set over a mustard yellow napkin. There's a fork resting on the bowl and more Yorkshire puddings in a Yorkshire pudding tin in the background.

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Yorkshire puddings in a Yorkshire pudding pan with a mustard yellow napkin and 3 forks in the background.

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Yorkshire puddings in a Yorkshire pudding pan with a mustard yellow napkin in the background.
Yorkshire puddings in a Yorkshire pudding pan with a mustard yellow napkin in the background.

No Fail Easy Yorkshire Pudding Recipe

Yield: 6
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Rest Time: 2 hours
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 2 hours 25 minutes

This easy, no fail, Yorkshire pudding recipe will become your go to for guaranteed perfection! No more deflated disasters in THIS kitchen!

Ingredients

  • 1 Egg, beaten
  • 60ml (4 tbsp) Milk
  • 60ml (4 tbsp) Water
  • 32g (4 tbsp) Plain/All Purpose Flour
  • 1/4 tsp Salt
  • Oil for Cooking

Essential Equipment

  • Jug
  • Fork/Whisk
  • Yorkshire Pudding Tin

Instructions

  1. Beat together the egg, milk and water in a jug with a fork.
  1. Add the flour and salt and beat again until smooth and lump free. If you are struggling with a fork, use a whisk instead. Cover and rest at room temperature for up to 4 hours (a minimum of 1 hour).
  2. When 20 mins is left on the timer, pour 1 tsp of oil into 6 of the Yorkshire pudding tin holes and place it on the top shelf in your oven. Preheat to 230ºC/Fan 220ºC/446ºF.
  3. When the oil is hot and the oven has preheated, pour the batter into the Yorkshire pudding tin holes. The oil should sizzle.
  4. Quickly put the tin back in the oven and bake for 15-20 mins until a dark brown colour.
  5. Serve immediately or reheat for 4-5 mins just before serving.

Notes

Please read through the main post before making this recipe. I've written lots of helpful information on how you can get perfect results every time. Not to mention some really simple (yet very effective) tips! Including the best oil to use, why resting the batter is important and how to bake them properly.

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As an Amazon Associate and member of other affiliate programs, I earn from qualifying purchases.

Nutrition Information:
Yield: 6 Serving Size: 1
Amount Per Serving: Calories: 37Total Fat: 1gSaturated Fat: 0gTrans Fat: 0gUnsaturated Fat: 1gCholesterol: 32mgSodium: 115mgCarbohydrates: 5gFiber: 0gSugar: 0gProtein: 2g

Nutritional information on kitchenmason.com should only be used as a general guideline, I am not a certified nutritionist. Please always check labels for allergens where applicable.

Did you make this recipe?

I'd love to hear about it! Please leave a comment on the blog or tag me on Instagram.

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Victoria Anne

Friday 2nd of April 2021

I doubled the recipe and cooked for 17 minutes and they were perfect 👌🏽 my attempts at other recipes have never turned out as good as this one.

Emma

Saturday 3rd of April 2021

Hi Victoria, that’s fantastic! I’m so happy you had such great success with my recipe! Thank you so much for taking the time to share this with me, you’ve made my day :)

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